Adrienne Hollis

Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists

Adrienne L. Hollis is the senior climate justice and health scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, where she leads the development, design, and implementation of methods for accessing and documenting the health impacts of climate change on communities of color and other traditionally disenfranchised groups. Hollis works with environmental justice communities to identify priority health concerns related to climate change and other environmental assaults, and evaluates climate and energy policy approaches for their ability to effectively address climate change and benefit underserved communities.

Prior to joining UCS, Hollis served as the director of federal policy at WE ACT for Environmental Justice and taught at the George Washington University Milken School of Public Health and the American University Washington College of Law. She has more than 20 years of extensive experience in the environmental arena, particularly focused on environmental justice, equity and inclusion, and the adverse health effects of environmental exposures and climate change on vulnerable communities, as an associate professor in public health, and as an environmental toxicologist and an environmental attorney.

She is a member of numerous organizations and boards, including the EPA’s Clean Air Act Advisory Committee, the National Adaptation Forum’s Steering Committee (co-chair) and its Equity Working Group, the American Public Health Association’s Environment Section and Environmental Justice Subcommittee, the Endangered Species Coalition (vice chair and co-general counsel) and the Green Leadership Trust. She earned a BS in biology from Jackson State University, a PhD in biomedical sciences from Meharry Medical College, a JD from Rutgers University School of Law, and completed postdoctoral studies at Harvard University School of Public Health.

Podcast Guest Appearances

Killer Combination: Climate, Health and Poverty

What happens when climate, public health and poverty converge?

Author and activist Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in rural Lowndes County, Alabama. When she moved back home in 2001, she immediately noticed that things were different.

“I knew that armadillos were not native to Alabama,” Flowers recalls. “But when I moved back, I started to see armadillos. I started to see palm trees grow in areas where they would not grow before.