Amy Myers Jaffe

Director, Energy Security and Climate Change Program, Council on Foreign Relations

This pattern where we decide that there’s some competition between jobs and environmental protection, this is a stupid idea… We, the public, are smarter than this. We need to stand up and say, ‘we care about both things and we want them to be done in a way that both are protected.’

A leading expert on global energy policy, geopolitical risk, energy and sustainability, Amy Myers Jaffe is the David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the program on Energy Security and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations.  She previously served as executive director for energy and sustainability at the University of California, Davis and senior advisor for energy and sustainability at Office of the Chief Investment Officer of the University of California, Regents. She was also formerly a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Prior to joining the University of California, Davis, Jaffe served as founding director of the Energy Forum at Rice University's James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy and its Wallace S. Wilson fellow for energy studies. She has taught energy policy, business, and sustainability courses at Rice University, University of California, Davis, and Yale University.

Live Event Appearances

Podcast Guest Appearances

A Paris Progress Report

In June 2017, President Trump announced his plan to withdraw the country from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, claiming it disadvantaged the United States. The symbolism of the American government’s retreat overshadowed the reality that the U.S. business community has embraced a low-carbon future. “We committed under Paris to do nothing we weren’t gonna do anyway and that we aren’t doing anyway,” says former Sierra Club chairman Carl Pope. Many countries have also reaffirmed their commitments to the Paris agreement. But how much progress has really been made, both at home and abroad?

COVID-19 and Climate: Economic Impacts

Apr 15 2020 - 12:00pm

The COVID-19 recession has happened faster and hit deeper than most people could have imagined. Perhaps not surprisingly, the people most at risk in a shuttered economy are often the same people who are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

“This crisis has served to expose some of the vulnerabilities of the economy,” says Kathleen Day, Finance Lecturer, Johns Hopkins University, “and one of those is that we have such a large number of people living from check to check.”