Climate disruption is changing weather around the world. Parts of America are seeing fierce droughts and then punishing storms and flooding. Scientists say the wets will get wetter and the dry periods will get drier. Water systems are stressed and farmers, city dwellers and fish are all affected. In response, new farming methods are being tried out. Creative conservation practices and new technologies are helping stretch each gallon. But the question remains: How much water will we have in the future? What will it cost?

Part 1: Chasing Water
Brooke Barton, Senior Program Director for the Water Program, Ceres
Peter Gleick, President, Co-Founder, The Pacific Institute; Author, Bottled and Sold
Brian Richter, Chief Water Scientist, The Nature Conservancy; Author, Chasing Water: A Guide for Moving from Scarcity to Sustainability

Part 2: Water Underfoot 
Debbie Davis, Community & Rural Affairs Advisor, Office of Planning and Research, State of California
Felicia Marcus, Chair, State Water Resources Control Board
Barton Thompson, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University

Part 3: Blue Economy
Mary Hagedorn, Research Scientist, Smithsonian Institution/Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
Michael Jones, President, The Maritime Alliance, San Diego
Jason Scorse, Director, Center for the Blue Economy, MIIS